Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ:ORCL) asked to pay Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) $1 million

A judge in charge of the lawsuit between Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ:ORCL) and Google Inc(NASDAQ:GOOG) has directed the former to pay the Internet search giant $1 million to cover its legal expenses.

In July, Google had demanded $4 million to cover its court costs, including almost $3 million towards  “fees for exemplification and the costs of making copies of any materials where the copies are necessarily obtained for use in the case,” and $1 millionfor “fees for printed or electronically recorded transcripts necessarily obtained for use in the case,” and “compensation of the court-appointed expert”.

Judge William Alsup refused Google’s request for recovery of nearly $3 million of document related costs. He is reported to have said, “The problem with Google’s e-discovery bill of costs is that many of [the] item-line descriptions seemingly bill for ‘intellectual effort’ such as organizing, searching, and analyzing the discovery documents. Most egregious are attempts to bill costs for ‘conferencing,’ ‘prepare for and participate in kickoff call,’ and communications with co-workers, other vendors, and clients. These are non-taxable intellectual efforts.”

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Google had earlier claimed to have collected case related documents from more than 86 custodians and to have “delivered to its document vendor over 97 million documents for electronic processing and review”.
It had all started with Oracle accusing Google of patent infringement by using Java for building its Android OS. Oracle had got the Java programming language after buying Sun Microsystems. Attempts at mediation between the two warring companies were made but failed as their expectations did not match. Google was willing to pay only a few million dollars in compensation, whereas Oracle expected to be paid hundreds of millions.

In June this year, a jury sided with Google and dismissed Oracle’s claim that Google had used its patents ruling that Java API elements cannot be copyrighted.

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